raspberry pi status update

You might have noticed meanwhile that Fedora 25 ships with raspberry pi support and might have wondered what this means for my packages and images.

The fedora images use a different partition layout than my images. Specifically the fedora images have a separate vfat partition for the firmware and uboot and the /boot partition with the linux kernels lives on ext2. My images have a vfat /boot partition with everything (firmware, uboot, kernels), and the rpms in my repo will only work properly on such a sdcard. You can’t mix & match stuff and there is no easy way to switch from my sdcard layout to the fedora one.

Current plan forward:

I will continue to build rpms for armv7 (32bit) for a while for existing installs. There will be no new fedora 25 images though. For new devices or reinstalls I recommend to use the official fedora images instead.

Fedora 25 has no aarch64 (64bit) support, although it is expected to land in one of the next releases. Most likely I’ll create new Fedora 25 images for aarch64 (after final release), and of course I’ll continue to build kernel updates too.

Finally some words on the upstream kernel status:

The 4.8 dwc2 usb host adapter driver has some serious problems on the raspberry pi. 4.7 works ok, and so do the 4.9-rc kernels. But 4.7 doesn’t get stable updates any more, so I jumped straight to the 4.9-rc kernels for mainline. You might have noticed already if you updated your rpi recently. The raspberry pi foundation kernels don’t suffer from that issue as they use a different (not upstream) driver for the dwc.

3 thoughts on “raspberry pi status update

  1. Gilles

    Hi,

    after upgrading from kernel-main 4.9.0.1 to 4.9.0.2 i am no more able to run docker-engine. unfortunately, i am not able to downgrade kernel-main package since it was removed. Could you please expose it again.

    Thank you in advance,

    Gilles

    1. Gerd Hoffmann Post author

      The 4.7 kernel is still in the repos. Also you should have the older kernel still installed, fedora keeps the three most recent kernels installed so you can go back by simply picking the older one in the boot menu. Or, in case this is a headless machine, by editing /boot/extlinux/extlinux.conf and moving the entry for the older kernel to the top of the list.

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